Nieuwenkamp Museum Foundation

Anecdote

Sjoerd the Roos was a graphic artist par excellence and in 1935 he wrote about Nieuwenkamp on the occasion of his 60th birthday (click here to read the article):

'... The School of Applied Arts, at the time run with so much commitment and enthusiasm, where some of them studied, but also the inspirational examples of Morris' works may have stimulated them to specialise in the applied arts, including graphic art. They created stylish prints, showing true craftsmanship, book decorations, address cards, bookplates etcetera, mostly from woodcuts. It is to them that we owe the development of this technique, its application to this book, and more in general to art...

...Consider for instance of the curious edition of the F. Bohn heirs Old Dutch Towns and Villages of the Zuiderzee [Oude Hollandsche Steden aan de Zuiderzee], published by Nieuwenkamp in collaboration with Veldheer. As well as a number of books that were decorated by Dijsselhof, Nieuwenhuis and Roland Holst, this one occupied an important place, because it contained topographical illustrations matching the text perfectly both in line and in colour value....

...The book Bali and Lombok, published on board the De Zwerver in 1906-1910, is all the more special, because it was Nieuwenkamp's own drawings that illustrated this travel report. Because of the rather large and unusual oblong format, necessary to picture the elongated landscape drawings and to take into account the images' placement and size, the columns next to these images contained text lines that were different in length. However, this did not distract. On the contrary, his highly successful solutions were usually logically justified.....

...These editions' bindings and covers, title pages, decorative letters and vignettes showed his predilection for decoration. His interest in the decorative arts is manifest in all his other lively and happy works. Needless to say, they contain elements of the popular arts he so much appreciated and with which he had a close affinity. This was very aptly expressed in the catalogue of his etchings and woodcuts, entirely carved from wood, which were published in a number of editions on board the De Zwerver in 1902, 1903 and 1904. The same goes for the powerful and colourful bindings and title vignettes of the aforementioned books. We should add a book, deserving special mention: My home on the water, my house in the country, published in 1930. Clearly, a finer composition. And here we will show you a few typical examples of his witty bookplates ...'